(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "The manufacture and properties of iron and steel"

INFLUENCE OF CERTAIN ELEMENTS ON STEEL.
361
suits can hardly be called conclusive, for the number of heats is too limited, but as the data on high-copper steels are uniform with the much larger number of similar angles given in Table XIV-H, and as the two separate averages for low copper correspond so closely to one another after allowance is made for the different thicknesses, it seems that the high copper is not in any way harmful.
A notable investigation into the effect of copper was conducted by Mr. A. L. Colby at the Bethlehem Steel "Works, and was described in The Iron Age, November 30, 1899. Steel containing 0.57 per cent, of copper was forged into crank shafts for the United States battleships and stood every test required by the Government specifications. Another ingot was forged into gun tubes for 6-inch guns for the United States Navy, and fulfilled every requirement of the department. Other exhaustive tests were made on plates and all the results pointed the same way.
SEC. XVIIg.—Influence of aluminum.—It is hardly necessary to discuss at length the effect of aluminum upon steel, for although it is often used to quiet the metal, it unites with the oxygen of the bath and passes into the slag. Sometimes a very small percentage remains in steel castings, while it is quite conceivable that other steels may receive a small overdose by mistake, so that Table
TABLE XVII-J. Physical Properties of Aluminum Steel.
NOTE.—Size of bars JJx J Inch-; all samples forged either "very well or fairly-well except No. 10 which was very shelly. The fractures from Nos. 1 to 7. inclusive, were granular, but Nos. 8,8, and 10 showed Increasing coarse crystallization. All bars bent double cold after annealing except No. 10. Attempts at welding were unsuccessful on samples Nos. 3,5, and 8.
							'I	••2	d	d	S
										t-<	Pi
	Composition; per cent.						.-to	l£	rt 2 "38,	oJ •5	jj"
							o"2 .	£ •	_0..	old £ <D	S o .
Pi 9							m	•Jfj	do	W 0 P i-•O 9 m pi	•S'rt S <0 ^ O
											
0	C.	Si.	S.	P.	Mn.	Al.	H	P	3		
1	.22	.09			.07	.15	47040	64960	86.70	62.9	72.4.
2	.15	.18	.10	.04	.18	.88	61520	67200	87.85	58.18	76.7
8	.20	.12			.31	.61	48160	62720	88.40	54.50	76.8
4	.18	.16	.09	.03	.14	.66	45920	64960	83.85	49.86	T0.7
6	.17	.10			.18	.72	49280	62720	40.00	60.74	78.6
0	.26	.15	.08	.04	.11	1.16	51520	78920	82.05	51.46	69.7
7	.21	.18			.18	1.60	44800	69440	82.70	52.14	64.5
8	.21	.18	.09	.03	.18	2.20	47040	69440	22.75	27.80	67.7
9	.24	.18			.82	2.24	48160	72800	20.67	2464	66.1
10	.22	.20	.08	.03	.22	6.60		85120	3.67	3.96